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My Portfolio > Article Archive > WISER's CHP Satellite Faculty Abstract Wins Awards

WISER's Children's Satellite Faculty Abstract Wins Multiple Awards

An abstract submitted by Children's Hospital WISER Satellite facility recently won several awards. "Embedding Patient Simulation in a Pediatric Cardiology Rotation: A Unique Opportunity for Improving Resident Education" won third place in the simulation section at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in Vancouver. It also won best resident/fellow abstract and best poster abstract at the UPMC Medical Education Annual Graduate Medical Education Leadership Conference on February 21, 2014.  WISER would like to congratulate the individuals involved for their hard work and efforts.  

Title
"Embedding Patient Simulation in a Pediatric Cardiology Rotation: A Unique Opportunity for Improving Resident Education" Shaun Mohan, MD, MPH1; Christopher W. Follansbee, MD2; Ugonna Nwankwo, MD2; Dena Hofkosh, MD, MEd2; Frederick S. Sherman, MD, MBA2; Melinda F. Hamilton, MD, MSc2,3.  1The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 2The Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, 3Peter M. Winter Institute for Simulation, Education, and Research (WISER).


Abstract
Objective: High fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been used in medical education to bridge gaps in medical knowledge and clinical skills.  Few studies have analyzed the impact of HFPS in subspecialty rotations for pediatric residents. We hypothesized that pediatric residents exposed to HFPS with a structured content curriculum would perform better on a case quiz than residents without exposure to HFPS. 

Design: Prospective randomized controlled

Setting: Tertiary-care free standing children's hospital

Interventions: During a cardiology rotation, senior pediatric residents completed an online pediatric cardiology curriculum and a cardiology quiz. After randomization into two groups, the study group participated in a fully debriefed HFPS session. The control group had no HFPS. 

Outcome Measures: Both groups completed a case quiz. Confidence surveys pre and post simulation were completed.  

Results: From October 2010 through March 2013, fifty-five residents who rotated through the pediatric cardiology rotation were used in the final analysis (30 control, 25 in the study group).  There was no significant difference between groups on the initial cardiology quiz.  The study group scored higher on the case quiz compared to the control group (p=0.024). Based on pre and post simulation questionnaires, residents' confidence in approaching a pediatric cardiology patient improved from an average Likert score of 5.1 to 7.5 (on scale of 0-10) (p<0.001).

Conclusion: Incorporation of HFPS into a pre-existing pediatric cardiology rotation was feasible and well received.  Our study suggests that simulation promotes increased confidence and may modestly improve clinical reasoning compared to traditional educational techniques.  Targeted simulation sessions may readily be incorporated into pediatric subspecialty rotations.


AWARDS
 
Best Resident/Fellow Abstract
Best Poster Abstract
The conference title: UPMC Medical Education Annual Graduate Medical Education Leadership Conference held in Pittsburgh on April 21, 2014
 
 
Pediatric Academic Societies 
Top abstracts in simulation-based medical education, third place winner
May 6, 2014
Vancouver, Canada